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TU/e Marketing and Innovation

Samenvatting van alle verplichte artikelen voor het van 1ZM11 Marketing and Innovation aan de TU Eindhoven. Gegeven door prof. Nijssen en dr. Joosten in 2017.
Cijfer voor het vak: 8

Artikelen:
2. Woodruff (1997). Customer value: the next source for competitive advantage.
7. Arts (2011). Generalizations on consumer innovation adoption: a meta-analysis on driers of intention and behavior.
8. Guiltinan (1999). Launch strategy, launch tactics and demand outcomes.
1. Verhoef (2009). Understanding the marketing departments influence within the firm.
1. De Luca (2005). Market knowledge dimensions and cross-functional collaboration: examining the different routes to product innovation performance.
2. Gourville (2006). Eager sellers, stony buyers.
3. Slater (1998). Customer-les and market-oriented.
3. Zhou (2005). The effects of strategic orientations on technology- and market-based breakthrough innovations
4. Tripsas (2000). Capabilities, cognition, and inertia: evidence from digital imaging.
4. Rosa (2005). Micro-level product-market dynamics: shared knowledge and its relationship to market development.
5. Coviello (2012). Creating major innovations with customers: insights from small and young technology firms.
5. Chang (2016). The effectiveness of customer participation in new product development.
5. von Hippel (2011). The age of the consumer innovator.
7. Lee (2003). New product launch strategy for network effect products
8. Hultink (1998). In search of generic launch strategies for new products.
10. Hillebrand (2011). Exploring CRM effectiveness: an institutional theory perspective.
10. Völckner (2006). Drivers of brand extension success.
11. Kumar (2016): Creating enduring customer value.
12. Wedel (2016). Marketing analytics for data-rich environments.


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Summary articles Marketing & Innovation
2016-2017 Q3
Contents
2. Woodruff (1997). Customer value: the next source for competitive advantage............................. 2
7. Arts (2011). Generalizations on consumer innovation adoption: a meta-analysis on driers of
intention and behavior. ......................................................................................................................... 7
8. Guiltinan (1999). Launch strategy, launch tactics and demand outcomes. ................................... 10
1. Verhoef (2009). Understanding the marketing departments influence within the firm. ................ 16
1. De Luca (2005). Market knowledge dimensions and cross-functional collaboration: examining the
different routes to product innovation performance. .......................................................................... 19
2. Gourville (2006). Eager sellers, stony buyers. ................................................................................... 22
3. Slater (1998). Customer-les and market-oriented. ........................................................................... 24
3. Zhou (2005). The effects of strategic orientations on technology- and market-based breakthrough
innovations............................................................................................................................................ 25
4. Tripsas (2000). Capabilities, cognition, and inertia: evidence from digital imaging. ........................ 28
4. Rosa (2005). Micro-level product-market dynamics: shared knowledge and its relationship to
market development. ........................................................................................................................... 29
5. Coviello (2012). Creating major innovations with customers: insights from small and young
technology firms. .................................................................................................................................. 32
5. Chang (2016). The effectiveness of customer participation in new product development. ............ 35
5. von Hippel (2011). The age of the consumer innovator. .................................................................. 38
7. Lee (2003). New product launch strategy for network effect products ........................................... 39
8. Hultink (1998). In search of generic launch strategies for new products. ........................................ 42
10. Hillebrand (2011). Exploring CRM effectiveness: an institutional theory perspective. .................. 43
10. Vlckner (2006). Drivers of brand extension success. .................................................................... 45
11. Kumar (2016): Creating enduring customer value.......................................................................... 47
12. Wedel (2016). Marketing analytics for data-rich environments. ................................................... 51


2. Woodruff (1997). Customer value: the next source for competitive
advantage.
Purpose it shows how companies can generate more competitive advantage through creating and
appropriating customer value through a customer value framework, customer value learning and
related managerial skills.
The next major source for competitive advantage will more likely come from more outward
orientation toward customers. In previous decades, companies have focused on quality
management, trying to improve their internal products and processes, but too often they reinforced
an internal orientation. Measurements such as the Customer Satisfaction Measurement (CSM) has
brought the voice of the customer into quality efforts. However, it has fallen short:
Many organization have responded by setting customer satisfaction goals and strategies, but
only a few have rigorously measured their customers satisfaction.
Even those companies that measure satisfaction may not act on the results.
As experience has grown with CSM, organizations have noticed problems, sometimes
satisfaction data does not correlate highly with organizational performance; satisfied
customers buying elsewhere.
The problem is that CSM is not backed up with in-depth learning about customer value and related
problems that underlie their evaluations, and companies now do not know how to respond.
Moreover, quality is no longer enough to gain enough competitive advantage. More and more
companies are switching their strategies to a superior customer value delivery. The question remains
not why to do it, but rather how to do it.

The concept of customer value
Trying to define customer value:
Areas of consensus Customer value is inherent in the use to some product. Moreover,
customer value is something perceived by customers, rather than objectively determined by a seller.
Finally these perceptions typically involve a trade-off between what the customer receives and what
he gives up to acquire and use a product.
Diverging concepts customer
value concepts differ as to the
circumstances within which customers
think about value. Figure 1 on the rights
shows two characteristics of customer
value capturing.
The columns (nature of information)
show that consumers value differently
at different times (each context has a
different judgment task); a snapshot
could refer to the moment of
purchasing where the consumer
evaluates alternatives; whereas the
longitudinal refers to during or after
use, where customers are more
concerned with performance. This
means that the timing changes the


attributes customers use the determine the value of a product.
The rows (information describes) concern what the customers perception of value is about. As
customers imagine what value they want, they learn to think concretely about value in the form of
preferred attributes, attribute performances, and consequences from using a product in a use
situation. Customers might predict received value, but during use they actual experience received
value (these concepts differ and might be a major influence in the upper left cell).
Customer value a customers perceived preference for and evaluation of those product
attributes, attribute performances, and consequences arising from use that facilitate achieving the
customers goals and purpose in use situations.
This definition adopts a customer perspective on value as it both incorporates desired and received
value and emphasizes that value stems from customers learned perceptions, preferences and
evaluations.
Figure 2 shows the customer value
hierarchy which suggests that customers
conceive of desired value in a meansend way.
Starting at the bottom of the
hierarchy customers learn to think about
products as bundles of specific
attributes and attribute performances.
When using the product, they
form desires for certain attributes to
achieve desired consequences.
Customers learn to desire
certain consequences according to their
ability to help them achieve their goals
and purposes.
Looking from the top down,
customers use goals to attach
importance or priority to consequences,
which guide customers when
attaching importance to attributes.
Customer value and customer
satisfaction have a lot of overlap as
they both describe the evaluative
judgment about products, both place
special importance on the use of the
situation. Figure three shows the
relationship between customer value
and customer satisfaction.
Overall satisfaction is the
customers feeling in response to
evaluations of one or more use
experiences with a product, but what
exactly do they evaluate The


customer value hierarchy (figure 2) helps to answer this question. It suggests that desired value is
composed of preference for specific and measurable dimensions (attributes, consequences and
goals) for use situations. Desired value guides customers when they form perceptions, when
evaluating use experiences on the dimensions. Received value may lead directly to the formation of
overall satisfaction feeling, or they may be compared to one or more standards (e.g. values,
predicted values) to form disconfirmation perceptions in another route to influence overall
satisfaction feelings.

Customer learning by organizations
There are differences in what organizations think customers value and what customers say they
value. Customer-learning processes should be aimed at reducing these gaps. Managers learn about
customers in two categories:
Informal learning includes trial-and-error experiences, feedback from sellers and personal
observations.
Formal learning contains all the various market and customer research methods.
CSM has grown popular due to the popularity of quality management. It starts with targeting certain
customers for learning, and determines what these customers want or require. It focusses on key
buying criteria, which are operationalized as customers preferred or desired attributes. By doing so,
organizations learn most of their customers at the lowest level of the hierarchy, not achieving an indepth understanding of their customers.
There is much improvement for the CSM. To expand the customer value and satisfaction
learning process the customer value determination (CVD) is introduced (figure 4).
It differs from CSM as it asks what
target customers (question 1) value
on all three levels of the hierarchy. As
this might provide hundreds of
attributes, the CVD ranks these on
importance (question 2). Moreover, it
allows the organization to evaluate
the seller on not only the attributes,
but also the consequences. It also
helps managers to understand why
products perform well or poor
(question 4).
Although the CVD offers a
good framework to identify important
opportunities to learn about
customers, it only does so in a formal
learning approach. The customer
value oriented marketing information
system (CVOMIS) helps to incorporate the formal CVD with informal learning into organizations.
Important characteristics of CVOMIS:
- A CVOMIS should help managers to learn about both customer-determined performance
outcomes of customer value delivery and the causes of the performance

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